5 Steps to a More Sustainable Wardrobe


 

With the fast fashion industry being one of the planet’s most damaging industries, it’s time that we all did our part to reduce the environmental impact of our wardrobe choices. You can do this by getting on board with the ethos of slow fashion. Making sustainable, ethical style choices is easier than you might think and there are lots of ways you can get involved in the growing trend of eco-friendly fashion.  Check out these simple steps that you can take to begin your journey.

  1. The 30 wears rule

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There’s a little rule in the sustainable fashion world which asks, “will you wear it at least 30 times?” If the answer is no, then think again before you purchase that piece of clothing. Unless it’s something like your wedding dress of course, where this rule doesn’t apply, but even so, a wedding dress can still be recycled. Anyway, we digress. The point is, we want you to embrace the concept of slow fashion and this means repeating your looks. You can make it easier to do this if you choose high quality, versatile pieces that won’t go out of fashion when the latest trends pass. Choosing versatile clothing is also a great way to create a capsule wardrobe, something which can help you to achieve the goal of wearing each piece 30 times over.

  1. Do your research

Until the rest of the world gets on board with the concept of sustainable and ethical fashion, the onus is on you to educate yourself and seek out sustainable options. You can also help to educate others by sharing posts like this and spreading the word.  Encouraging small and passionate brands such as ourselves at Vino Supraja means that you’re helping to support the important growth of slow fashion. There are more sustainable and ethical brands out there than most people might think and avoiding fast fashion retailers doesn’t have to hit your pockets hard. With a bit of browsing online, you can easily find sustainable brands that offer styles and prices that will work for your taste and budget.  

  1. Repair, reuse, recycle!

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A mantra that we love is, “make do and mend”. It came about in Britain during the Second World War when there was clothes rationing in place. Adults and children alike were encouraged to learn how to patch up and recycle their clothes before replacing them. With the Maker Movement being a growing trend today, why not get involved and learn to sew? And if sewing is not your thing, there’s always the option of getting a professional to repair your clothes before you pronounce them dead. If you really feel it’s time to throw something out, ask yourself if it could be used by someone else first. Donating clothes is not only a good deed on your part but it’s also a great way to support sustainability. A one in, one out, policy is a good way to manage your wardrobe and can help to deter you from making impulsive purchases.

  1. Shop vintage

It has been said that shopping for vintage clothes could actually be the most eco-friendly way to shop. Producing new clothes has a devastating effect on the planet, with the United Nations estimating that 10 percent of total global emissions come from the fashion industry. And greenhouse gasses are only one part of it. Our waterways are affected by toxic chemicals from producing dyes, forests are being destroyed for wood based fabrics (like rayon and viscose) and our sea life is ingesting plastic microfibers from polyester fabrics, which then end up in our food chain. We could go on but hopefully we’ve made the case for shopping vintage.

  1. Change your spending habits

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Many of us can admit to being guilty of spending our hard earned cash on a haul of fast fashion items. It can be hard to ignore a sale and the resulting temptation to go on a shopping spree. But whilst filling up your basket with bargains can feel like you’re winning, actually you’re not. Try to get into the habit of investing your money in fewer, better quality clothes which will last longer. Not only will you be doing yourself and the planet a favour, but you will be helping to support an ethical approach to fashion production. Local weavers, tailors and other artisans in garment worker communities are provided with ethical working environments, rights and wages when they’re involved in sustainable fashion.

 


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